SMA High Academic Pathways

SMA High offers various academic pathways that are based in career and college readiness programs where all learners can set a course that fits their own goals and aspirations as life long learners and global citizens who can positively impact their lives, their communities and the world.

SMA High has created an intimate learning community that allows students to pursue a diverse set of academic pathways based on what is the best fit for who they are and how they learn. 

Course Descriptions

Advanced Placement (AP)

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION - 1001420 Pre-IB Grade 10; 11-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the most recent ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair

Students write in a variety of forms (e.g., narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative essays) on a variety of subjects (e.g., public policies, popular culture, personal experiences) extending from reading assignments representing numerous prose styles and genres. Writing proceeds through several stages of drafts, with revision aided by teacher and peers. Students also write in informal contexts designed to help them become increasingly aware of themselves as writers and of the techniques employed by authors. Rhetorical strategies and techniques are explored using both literary and non-fiction selections. Students learn to analyze how graphics and visual images relate to written texts and can serve as alternative forms of text. In a researched argumentation paper, students must analyze and synthesize information and ideas from an array of sources, as well as evaluate, use, and cite primary and secondary sources. Students learn to cite these sources using the format specified by the Modern Language Association. Detailed instruction and feedback is given to students by the AP teacher related to appropriate use of sentence structure (subordination and coordination); effective use of vocabulary; quality of illustrative detail; establishment of tone; and, the use of logical organization, as enhanced by specific techniques to increase coherence (e.g., repetition, transitions, emphasis, etc.).

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION - 1001430 Grades 10, 11- 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the most recent ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair

This Advanced Placement Literature course is designed to be a university-level course providing intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate English literature class. As a culmination of the course, students will take the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam given in May. Major course goals for AP English Literature, as prescribed by the College Board, including carefully reading and analyzing literature to understand the way writers use language to provide meaning. Students study works from various genres and time periods (16th to 20th century) and considers the social and historical values each work reflects and embodies. In addition to considering a work’s structure, style, and themes, students learn to understand a work’s complexity and richness of meaning, as well as evaluate that meaning through the author’s use of connotation, figurative language, symbolism, irony, syntax, and tone. Students write for a variety of purposes, including expository, analytical, and argumentative, and learn to use wide-ranging vocabulary with resourcefulness and accuracy.

AP CALCULUS AB 1202310 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Since this Advanced Placement course is a college-level and textdependent class, cadets must have earned a minimum score of 3 on the FSA/ELA Test. It is recommended that cadets have completed Calculus and is recommended by their teacher.

This course is designed to offer students college-level mathematics under the Guidelines of the Advanced Placement Program. Major topics of study include the use of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and mathematical modeling of differential equations; and the applications of these concepts. It will follow the outline set forth by the College Board for Advanced Placement Calculus AB, and is modeled upon and includes the content of a comparable college program, with the primary intent the successful completion of the AP Calculus exam, for college credit.

AP PSYCHOLOGY 2107350 Grade 10 – 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the acting Department Chair

AP Psychology is designed for students who wish to experience a college-level introductory course in psychology, and prepare for the rigorous AP Psychology exam. It is designed to replace Introduction to Psychology in a student’s freshmen year in college, and student’s study habits should reflect this fact. Students who chose this course should do so with the understanding that only self-motivated, dedicated, serious students will be successful. The main objective in teaching this course is to prepare students to score at least a 3 on the AP Exam offered by the College Board in May. Students will be exposed to many fields of interest in psychology. Topics covered will be the History of Psychology, Personality Development, Altered States of Consciousness (sleep, dreams, and hypnosis), Learning, Memory, Abnormal Behavior, Biological Basis of Behavior, Motivation, Sensation, Perception, Health Psychology and Social Psychology. Students are expected to develop their critical thinking while building their reading, writing and discussion skills.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY - 2103400 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the most recent ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair or IB Coordinator for Pre-IB.

The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.

AP U.S. HISTORY - 2100330 Grade 11 – 12, credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Placement in this course requires a 3 or above on the FSA ELA.

Advanced Placement (AP) World History is a college-level course offered as a substitute to general World History, and is typically taken in the sophomore year by those students seeking to earn college credit by taking the APWH examination. This exam is offered nationally by the College Board in the spring semester. AP World at Sarasota Military Academy is intended to be the second of three AP courses offered in the social studies, between AP Human Geography and AP United States History. Students will be assessed at the anticipated difficulty level of the College Board examination, and as such should expect this course to be a high-difficulty course with a mandatory time commitment outside of the classroom. Despite its difficulty, however, AP World is intended to be the most comprehensive study of the human story that is possible, given the time constraints of a semester class.

AP SPANISH (Spanish Language and Culture) - 0708400 Prerequisite: Approval of Spanish Teacher and 85% or higher in preceding levels of Spanish

The AP program offers the Spanish Language Exam. It is intended for qualified students wishing to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, using authentic materials and sources. Students are prepared to demonstrate their level of proficiency across three communicative modes: Interpersonal Interactive communication, Receptive communication and Presentational communication. The course is comparable to third year College courses that focus on speaking and writing at an advanced level.

Art & Music

BAGPIPES I-IV 1302460-90 Grade 9 – 12, Credit 1.0

The objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity for growth, development, and fulfillment in Bagpipe Music, Theory and Performance. This course covers all types of bagpipe music, including Ceol Mor and Ceol Beag, and studies the prominent composers from MacCrimmon to the present day. Students compose their own material in all time signatures commonly used. This course covers Piobaireachd, Marches, Strathspeys, Reels, Hornpipes, and Jigs, as well as harmony and the ability to write out tunes from repetitive listening. All aspects of bagpipe maintenance are covered in this course, from basic hemping and tying in bags to reeds set-up and manipulation. The course includes the study of all types of reeds, cane and synthetic, as well as drone and chanter. This course prepares students for Bagpipe Theory are covered, including time signatures, grand staff, musical rudiments, musical terms and definitions, and writing of simple tunes from memory. The SMA Bagpipers and Pipe Band routinely provide performances around town.

BAND I-IV 1302300-303 Grade 9 – 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Own or rent instrument

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic technical skills on wind or percussion instruments through the refinement and performance of high school band literature. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills in interpretation of notation and expressive markings, individual and ensemble performance, and critical listening.

DRUMS I-IV 1300350-380 Grade 9 – 12, Credit 1.0

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic performance skills on a percussion instrument in a solo or small ensemble setting using varied high school literature. Performance techniques, music knowledge, critical analysis, and aesthetic response are emphasized.

GUITAR I-IV 1301320-50

Students with little or no experience develop basic guitar skills and knowledge, including simple and full-strum chords, bass lines and lead sheets, barre and power chords, foundational music literacy and theory, major scales, simple finger-picking patterns, and ensemble skills for a variety of music. Beginning guitarists explore the careers and music of significant performers in a variety of styles. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students may be required to attend and/or participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom. This course may also require students to obtain a musical instrument (e.g., borrow, rent, purchase) from an outside source.

MUSIC APPRECIATION 1301310 Grade 9 – 12, Credit 1.0

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic skills in music theory and music history. Emphasis is placed on basic theory and the eras of music, and the people who shaped music from Gregorian chant to rap. This is a wonderful opportunity for students who do not play an instrument to learn about music. This course fulfills the fine arts requirement for graduation.

DRAWING I Grades 9-12, Credit .5 A proven and data-driven five-step approach to increase student ability to see and draw as an artist while also engaging the creative right side of the brain. Systematic and comprehensive curriculum covers all current National and Florida standards for the Visual Arts. Developed from the latest research in Art Education this Drawing class includes a study of brain function in art making in addition to established elements and principles of art and design. Introduction to a variety of materials in addition to solid foundational skills including composition, design, value, perspective, proportion, negative space, contour, and gesture drawing. DRAWING II Grades 9-12, Credit .5 Development and application of skills acquired in Drawing I. Introduction to advanced compositional development influenced by integrated art history study. Literacy and technology skills are used in conjunction with drawing and combine to provide more complex and content-driven assignments. Successful completion of Drawing I and II provide a solid foundation for advanced college-level coursework. PAINTING I Grades 9-12, Credit .5 Prerequisite: Drawing I & II An introduction to the fundamentals of color theory and painting best practices. Curriculum developed from current National and Florida standards for art education. Further application of concepts acquired in Drawing class combine with the science of color theory to allow the student to gain a working knowledge of studio practice. A variety of mediums and techniques along with live and video demonstration enhance student understanding and ability. PAINTING II Grades 9-12, Credit .5 Prerequisite: Painting I A continuation and further application of the skills and knowledge acquired in Painting I. Students begin to put their skills to use while also exploring various periods of Art History. Assignments range from still life, landscape and abstract composition incorporating theories of color and design. Further development of the ability to handle mediums, materials and studio practice. Project-based classroom environment incorporates a wide variety of methods to address all learners. 3D Art Prerequisite: Drawing I & II This course will take a comprehensive look at a variety of three-dimensional art incorporating the technology of today with the traditions of the past. Explore a variety of methods and materials to create engaging and thought-provoking art. From introduction and analysis to methods and materials students explore a variety of mediums including modeling with clay, relief sculpture, found art, molds, plaster, tape and paper mache. Hands-on application of knowledge provides all students with the opportunity to create three-dimensional objects.

Dual Enrollment

SMA offers juniors and seniors the opportunity to take State College of Florida (SCF) courses. For some cadets, this is a valuable way to earn college course credit free of charge and still complete high school requirements for graduation. The student may choose to take one or more SCF courses and even achieve an associate degree while earning their high school diploma.

This program choice is for young adults who can manage both the coursework and the schedule. The SCF dual enrollment program is an excellent option to get a head start on a college career and save considerable tuition dollars.

Contact the Dual Enrollment Coordinator tina.hodges@oursma.org for more information about the SCF Dual Enrollment program.

English & Language Arts

ENGLISH

Expectations for students choosing the Honors course will be more demanding and rigorous than those for the regular English courses including a higher level Vocabulary and more challenging literary selections. Only students who wish to have the rigor of college preparatory English classes should choose English Honor classes.

DEBATE I - 1007330 Grade 9- 12, Credit 1.0

Note: This course can be applied toward the 1.0 fine arts graduation requirement.

Students will develop fundamental skills and techniques for use in debate and forensic activities, including research skills, logic and critical-thinking skills, communication skills, and public speaking techniques. Students will have an opportunity to improve their debate and argumentation skills through classroom assignments and practice, utilizing various timing and judging techniques.

DEBATE II - 1007340 Grade 9- 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: a passing grade of 70 or above in Debate I

Note: This course can be applied toward the 1.0 fine arts graduation requirement.

This course will assist students in expounding upon the basic research and debate skills acquired in Debate I (1007330) and will provide students with more opportunities to research debate complex issues. Students will engage in team debate competitions within the classroom, and practice parliamentary debate and procedures.

ENGLISH I - 1001310 Grade 9, Credit 1.0

This Core Curriculum course utilizes thematic relationships in literature and targets student learning by using reading strategies to construct meaning from text, acquiring an extensive vocabulary, using process writing strategies, student inquiry, and self-monitoring techniques, using speaking, listening, and viewing strategies, understanding and responding to a variety of literary forms, developing research skills, and understanding and using language successfully. Core selections include The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, short stories, novels, poems, and non-fiction texts. Significant projects include research, writing, and oral presentations.

ENGLISH I HONORS - 1001320 Grade 9, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Placement in this course will be based on a grade of 80 or above in 8th Grade English, as well as FSA reading and writing test scores of 3 or above.

The course requirements for this honors course are consistent with English I (1001310). Content for the course, however, will be enriched and extended via the provision of additional reading and writing assignments, and greater in-depth analysis of coursework materials. Students will be expected to demonstrate increasing independence in the application of required skills and strategies and encouraged to apply critical analysis at all levels of the learning process.

ENGLISH II - 1001340 Grade 10, Credit 1.0

This core curriculum course utilizes the theme community and targets student learning by using reading strategies to construct meaning from text, acquiring an extensive vocabulary, using process writing strategies, student inquiry, and self-monitoring techniques, using speaking, listening, and viewing strategies, understanding and responding to a variety of literary forms, and understanding and using language successfully. Core texts include classic novels, selected short stories and poems, non-fiction texts, and Shakespeare. A primary focus of the course will be on refining language conventions in conjunction with developing descriptive, expository, and persuasive writing skills in preparation for FSA. Note-taking, reading comprehension, and research skills will be cultivated to prepare students for their FSA reading and writing assessments.

ENGLISH II HONORS - 1001350 Grade 10, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: grade of 80 or above in English I Honors and/or minimum FSA reading/writing score of 3 and prior approval by an ELA teacher or the Department Chair

The course requirements for this honors course are consistent with English II (1001340). Content for the course, however, will be enriched and extended via the provision of additional reading and writing assignments, and greater in-depth analysis of coursework materials. Students will be expected to demonstrate increasing independence in the application of required skills and strategies and encouraged to apply critical analysis at all levels of the learning process.

ENGLISH III - 1001370 Grade 11, Credit 1.0

In this core curriculum course, selected American literary works of various genres in relation to the development of the distinctive qualities of our national literature are studied. Political, cultural, social and historical forces and movements in America as reflected in its literary movements are identified. Students read and respond to a variety of authors, texts and genres, and share responses to extend understanding, create interpretations, make connections, and develop an appreciation. Proficiency, confidence, and fluency in reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing are developed. Students write in a variety of formats and develop communication skills through class discussions and presentation. The course integrates grammar, usage, and vocabulary development throughout all of its phases, and emphasizes skills covered by the SAT and ACT Tests.

ENGLISH III HONORS - 1001380 Grade 11, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: minimum grade of 80 in English II Honors and/or minimum Grade 10 FSA reading/writing score of 3 and prior approval by an ELA teacher or the Department Chair. 

The course requirements for this honors course are consistent with English III (1001370). Content for the course, however, will be enriched and extended via the provision of additional reading and writing assignments, and greater in-depth analysis of coursework materials. Students will be expected to demonstrate increasing independence in the application of required skills and strategies and encouraged to apply critical analysis at all levels of the learning process.

ENGLISH IV - 1001400 Grade 12, Credit 1.0

British literary works of various genres are studied in relationship to the historical and cultural forces that influenced them and led to various literary movements. Students further develop and refine language skills in preparation for college, including grammar, vocabulary, reading, and comprehension. Using representative examples from each period, students analyze, interpret and reflect upon changes in language and the development of literary traditions. Opportunities are provided for writing, speaking, and listening, including the research and writing of a literary analysis and research paper with proper bibliographic and parenthetical citations.

ENGLISH IV HONORS - 1001410 Grade 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: minimum grade of 80 in English III Honors and/or minimum Grade 10 FSA reading/writing score of 3 and prior approval by an ELA teacher or the Department Chair. 

This course will survey masterpieces of British literature and the evolution of the English language from Beowulf to The Canterbury Tales to Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Students further develop and refine language skills in preparation for college, including intensive practice in grammar, usage and vocabulary acquisition. Students will be expected to demonstrate increasing independence in the application of required skills and strategies and encouraged to apply critical analysis at all levels of the learning process. Opportunities are provided for writing, speaking, and listening, including the research and writing of literary analysis and research paper.

INTENSIVE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 1000410 Grades 9-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Administrative placement based on previous year’s FSA-ELA score.

The purpose of this course is to provide instruction that enables students to accelerate the development of reading and writing skills and to strengthen those skills so they are able to successfully read and write grade-level text independently. Instruction emphasizes reading comprehension, writing fluency, and vocabulary study through the use of a variety of literary and informational texts encompassing a broad range of text structures, genres, and levels of complexity. Course work will emphasize the skills to be tested on FSA-ELA and SAT/ACT. Completion of this course results in an elective credit. No English credit is given for this course. Important Note: Reading and writing courses may not be used in place of English Language Arts courses; reading and writing courses are intended to be used to supplement further study in English Language Arts.

JROTC

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING I - 1801300 Grade 9, Credit 1.0

The first year introduces students to American symbols, customs, and traditions, the history of our Armed Forces and the introduction to Community Service Projects. Discussions also cover the purpose of the Army JROTC, an introduction to the Department of Defense, and an opportunity to participate in extracurricular competitions. Finally, students have an opportunity to learn the basic principles of leadership and participate in Physical Training.

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING II - 1801310 Grades 10, Credit 1.0

The second-year course continues the objectives of Leadership Education with increased emphasis on all areas of leadership development. New styles, values, principles of the BE, KNOW and DO attributes. Introduction of First Aid, Land Navigation, healthy lifestyle, development of social responsibility, conflict resolution, and participate in service-learning projects. Continue to participate in extracurricular competitions and PT to further develop the student’s motor skills. Students who complete their 2nd year of JROTC will be eligible for a HOPE and Performing Arts waiver.

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING III - 1801320 Grades 11-12, Credit 1.0

The third-year students will begin the planning process, decision- making, problem-solving process and opportunities to supervise. Look more into understanding human needs, assume staff positions, start the mentor and teaching process, prepare students to assume key leadership positions through counseling and demonstrated leadership skills. Lead large groups of students in competitions and PT. Third-year students interested in fouryear JROTC scholarship will have the opportunity to start the process to compete for a full scholarship.

LEADERSHIP EDUCATION AND TRAINING IV - 1801330 Grades 11-12, Credit 1.0

Fourth-year JROTC students assume key leadership positions and gain experience as mentors, coaches, teachers and start the teamwork process for the younger students. The students are introduced to financial planning, career planning, scholarship opportunities, and lead in various community and school-related activities. Continue leadership development as leaders on teams and small groups.

International Baccalaureate (Pre-IB & IB Diploma Program)

All SMA students take Pre-IB Inquiry Skills. Pre-IB and IB students follow a 4-year progression of courses but it is possible to enter IB in 10th or 11th grade, without having been in Pre-IB, with approval from the IB Coordinator.

IB courses are offered at both the Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL). Standard Level courses may be one or two years in length requiring 150 hours of study. Higher Level courses are two years in length requiring 240 hours of study. The breadth, depth, and level of understanding expected at the higher level are greater as reflected in the course requirements and assessments.

IB students follow a 4-year progression of course. Evaluation. IB courses are evaluated through a combination of internal and external assessments. The internal assessment(s) is administered and scored by the classroom teacher and takes place sometime in the duration of the course. The external assessment is administered and scored by IB and takes place in May of the final year of the course as scheduled by IB. Both the internal and external assessments become part of the student’s overall score for the course. This score may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

PRE-IB INQUIRY SKILLS - 1700360 Grades 9-10, Credit 1.0

This course is required for all 9th-grade students. This course is designed to prepare students for high school. It consists of the following: Students will explore the following areas of study: The IB Learner Profile, High School Survival and Resources, Learning Styles, Time Management, Study Skills, Organizational Skills, Test-taking Skills, Cooperative Learning Skills, How to Formulate Questions, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Writing Skills and Styles, Communication Skills and Safety, Good Academic Practices, The Research Process (developing and articulating research questions and using MLA format), and International-mindedness

For IB DP students: Grades 11-12 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (ToK) 0900800/0900810

As part of the core of the Diploma Program, TOK explores critical thinking and inquiring into how we know what we do and provides coherence to the IB Program. The course will span the two years of the program by being taught during the spring semester of the student’s junior year and the fall semester of the student’s senior year. Students will be encouraged to analyze statements about knowledge and open questions about knowledge. These will be distinguished between shared knowledge and personal knowledge. Additionally, the course will study eight ways of knowing and eight areas of knowledge. The goal is for students to become aware of their own perspectives and those of the groups with whom they share knowledge. In short, this is a course in knowing about knowing.

GROUP1 (ENGLISH)

IB LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE HL – 2 Years 1005850/1005856

The aim of this course is to develop “critical literacy” in students and is composed of four parts: two of which focus on language and two on literature. Important to the study of both are the contexts in which the texts are constructed; time, place, purpose, etc. Students are encouraged to question the meaning of language and text, both literary and non-literary, through textual analysis. This analysis will consider the texts as they stand alone, as well as, in relation to the culture from which they come. English language skills will be developed by examining how formal elements of language are utilized to create meaning both by the author and the reader, as well as, to construct argument and rhetoric. A wide range of texts will be examined including social media, texting, news reporting, political campaigns, graffiti, video games, and works of literature both American and works in translation. IB English Language and Literature requires a variety of internal and external written and oral assessments which will begin in the junior year and conclude during the senior year. A student may opt to take the AP Language and Composition exam at the end of the junior year as well. The IB exam in Language and Literature will take place at the end of senior year. The IB or AP exams may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

GROUP 2 (World Language)

IB SPANISH - 0708830/0708840, IB CHINESE - 0711836/0711820 SL/HL – 2 Years Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or Chinese 2 or approval by IB coordinator

The continuing development of more sophisticated language skills and the acquisition will be the focus of these courses. Skills will emphasize comprehension and communication of language in oral and written form. Interactions will have an expectation of appropriate register and consideration of audience and purpose with fluency. Material for the study will be chosen from a range of written and spoken exercises including everyday conversations, authentic literary texts, social media, and pop culture. Students at both the SL and HL levels will be expected to develop their intercultural understanding, comprehend and use the language in various contexts and for varying purposes, acquire an appreciation of the perspectives of people from other cultures, and have the ability to recognize the relationship between the language and the culture from which it comes. Students who study at the HL level will engage with two full works of literature in the language of study. IB Spanish and Chinese require a variety of internal and external written and oral assessments which will begin in the junior year and conclude during the senior year. Students will be required to take the IB exam in their language of study at the end of senior year. At the end of senior year, a student may opt to take the AP exam in their language of study as well. The IB or AP exams may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

GROUP 3 (SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IB HISTORY OF AMERICAS (HOA) - 2100800 HL – 2 Years Prerequisite: AP Human Geography or AP World History or approval by IB coordinator.

Students in this course will explore the past and construct meaning through the use of primary and secondary source documents and critical evaluation of data. They will develop a sense of historiography and an appreciation for the way in which the perception of history changes with the emergence of new evidence and perspectives. The first year of the course will focus on the History of the Americas with its main emphasis on United States history. An in-depth study will take place on several key periods since our nation’s birth. The second year of the course will hone in on the 20th century and the events that have shaped our world today, again, with special emphasis placed on key topics. It is a goal of the course that students emerge with the understanding that we can only comprehend and successfully navigate the time we live in by reflecting upon the past. IB History of the Americas requires a variety of internal and external written assessments which will begin in the junior year and conclude during the senior year. Students may opt to take the AP Exam in United States History. Students are required to take the IB exam at the end of senior year. The IB or AP exams may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

IB PSYCHOLOGY - 2107820 HL or SL - 2 Years

Students in this course will examine the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior, individuals and societies. Students undertaking the course can expect to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied. This will allow them to have a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The holistic approach reflected in the curriculum, which sees biological, cognitive and sociocultural analysis being taught in an integrated way ensures that students are able to develop an understanding of what all humans share, as well as the immense diversity of influences on human behavior and mental processes. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are also key considerations of the IB psychology course. IB Psychology requires a variety of internal and external written assessments which will begin in the junior year and conclude during the senior year. Students may opt to take the AP Exam in Psychology. Students are required to take the IB exam at the end of senior year. The IB or AP exams may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

GROUP 4 (Experimental Sciences)

IB BIOLOGY - 2000805 HL or SL - 2 Years Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair and IB Coordinator

This course provides students with an in-depth study of biological concepts and principles. IB-SL Biology includes biochemistry, cell biology, classic genetics, molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolution. The course focuses on the structure and function of living organisms and the interactions between organisms and their environment. It includes an in-depth study of plants and animals, including evolutionary relationships, anatomy and physiology, and the principles of ecology. There is a strong component emphasizing the process of scientific inquiry. Students will be capable of taking the IB SL exam in the spring of their junior or senior year.

IB CHEMISTRY - 2003810 SL – 2 Years Prerequisites: Biology and/or Chemistry.

This course explores the relationship between theory and experimentation with which students will engage in this course. It is the foundation for both the physical environment and biological systems. Students will develop practical skills and techniques and increase their use of math to engage with an experiment based, inquiry approach including labs and practical activities. An integrated project involving the other experimental sciences of Physics and Biology and an independent investigation will be part of the learning process as well. Topics for study include Stoichiometric relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding and structure, energetics/thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox processes, organic chemistry, and measurement and data processing. IB Chemistry requires a variety of internal and external assessments throughout the year. Students will be required to take the IB exam at the end of the year and may opt to take the AP Exam in Chemistry as well. The IB or AP exams may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

IB COMPUTER SCIENCE - 0200800 HL - 2 Years Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair and IB Coordinator

This course is normally taken over two years (unless otherwise approved by the teacher). Basic topics include system fundamentals, planning, computer organization, hardware, networks, computational thinking, problem-solving and programming. Advanced topics include abstract data structures, resource management, and control systems. Students learn about object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. Students complete a programming project and a case study. This course may be taken in preparation for the International Baccalaureate Computer Science examination.

IB Design Technology - 2003862 SL - 1 Year

Design technology aims to develop internationally-minded people whose enhanced understanding of design and the technological world can facilitate our shared guardianship of the planet and create a better world. It focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis, and evaluation. The creative tension between theory and practice is what characterizes design technology within the DP sciences subject group. Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the subject. DP design technology requires the use of the DP design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. In Diploma Programme design technology, a solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently. DP design technology achieves a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop critical-thinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. While designing may take various forms, it will involve the selective application of knowledge within an ethical framework. A well-planned design program enables students to develop not only practical skills but also strategies for creative and critical thinking. Both science and technology have a fundamental relationship with design. Technology preceded science, but now most technological developments are based on scientific understanding. Traditional technology comprised useful artifacts often with little understanding of the science underpinning their production and use. In contrast, modern technology involves the application of scientific discoveries to produce useful artifacts. The application of scientific discovery to solve a problem enables designers to create new technologies and these new technologies, in turn, can impact the rate of scientific discovery. The aim of the DP design technology course is to foster skill development in students required to use new and existing technologies to create new products, services, and systems.

IB MARINE SCIENCE - 2002810 SL 1 Year Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair and IB Coordinator

IB Marine Science is a capstone science course - incorporating elements of biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Students will be expected to understand the role of marine science in today’s world including the current applications to the areas of medicine, biodiversity, conservation, climate change, environment and the significance of these developments. This course will incorporate fieldwork, trips to local laboratories, and video conferencing with experts in the field when available.

GROUP 5 (MATH) IB

IB MATHEMATICS: ANALYSIS and APPROACHES SL 2 Years Prerequisites: Cadets must demonstrate proficiency in Algebra 2 skills. Teacher recommendation and IB Coordinator approval required.

The IB Mathematics Analysis and Approaches SL (standard level) and HL (high level) course is intended for students who wish to pursue studies in mathematics at university or subjects that have a large mathematical content; it is for students who enjoy developing mathematical arguments, problem-solving and exploring real and abstract applications, with and without technology. SL (standard level) requires strong Algebra 2 skills. HL (high level) requires very strong Algebra 2 skills. Students interested in social sciences, natural sciences, business psychology and design should take this course. Students unsure of their major in college should take the course that interests them, is both challenging to them personally and in which they can perform well.

IB MATHEMATICS: APPLICATIONS and INTERPRETATION SL 2 Years Prerequisites: Cadets must demonstrate proficiency in Algebra 1 skills. Teacher recommendation and IB Coordinator approval required.

The IB Mathematics Applications and Interpretation SL (standard level)and HL (high level) course is designed for students who enjoy describing the real world and solving practical problems using mathematics, those who are interested in harnessing the power of technology alongside exploring mathematical models and enjoy the more practical side of mathematics. This course includes statistics. It is intended to meet the needs of students whose interest in mathematics is more practical. SL (standard level) requires strong Algebra 1 skills. HL (high level) requires strong Algebra 2 skills. Students interested in engineering, physical sciences, and economics should take this course. Students unsure of their major in college should take the course that interests them, is both challenging to them personally and in which they can perform well.

GROUP 6 (THE ARTS)

IB FILM STUDIES - 017474 HL - 2 years

The creation, presentation and study of film requires courage, passion and curiosity: courage to create individually and as part of a team, to explore ideas through action and harness the imagination, and to experiment; passion to communicate and to act communally, and to research and formulate ideas eloquently; curiosity about self and others and the world, about different traditions, techniques and knowledge, about the past and the future, and about the limitless possibilities of human expression through the art form. At the core of the IB film course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis that is achieved through practical engagement in the art and craft of film. An HL student should display a continuous resolve of personal challenge and a sustained engagement with the ideas, practices and concepts encountered within the course over the extended learning time available. An HL student has extra time for these encounters, extra time to reflect and to record evidence of growth. It is understood that ensuing developments may be only partially evident within the framework of the assessment process. IB Film requires a variety of internal and external assessments throughout the year. Students will be required to take the IB exam at the end of the year the senior year. The IB may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university. *Some of the language used in these course descriptions was taken from the official guide for those courses published by the International Baccalaureate Organization.

IB MUSIC - 1300818 SL - 2 years

In this course at SMA, students that are in drumline will be in IB drumline. Students will learn to hear the relationships of the pitch in sound, pattern in rhythm and unfolding sonic structures. Musical perception is required as an area of study and will investigate musical links. Students will choose to exhibit their learning through the creation of music, solo performance, or group performance. Music that is familiar and unfamiliar from a range of times, places, and cultures will also be part of the course. IB Music requires a variety of internal and external assessments throughout the year. Students will be required to complete a written assessment as well as creating and performance component. The IB assessments may earn a student college credit dependent upon their score and the policy of the college or university.

Mathematics

HONORS COURSES - In mathematics, honors courses include a greater breadth and rigor of content, which results in a faster paced delivery. There are no honors courses beyond Algebra 2 because all courses after this level are considered “honors.”

ALGEBRA IA/IB 1200370/1200380 Grades 9-12 Credits 1.0 or 2.0 Prerequisite: Level 3 or below in Pre-Algebra, Level 3 or below in FSA-ELA 1.0 for college transcript credit or 2.0 for graduation credit

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, called units, deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

ALGEBRA I 1200310 Grade 9-10, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: C or higher in 8th grade math, Level 3 or higher on Pre-algebra and FSAELA, teacher recommendation

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, called units, deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course, and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

ALGEBRA 1 HONORS 1200320 Grade 9-11, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: B or higher in 8th grade honors math, teacher recommendation, level 4- 5 on FSA-ELA and Pre-algebra FSA

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students also engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. Critical areas include Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling.

ALGEBRA II 1200330 Grade 9-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite Regular: C or better in Geometry, level 3 or better on FSA-ELA, and teacher recommendation.

Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. The critical areas for this course, organized into five units, are as follows:

ALGEBRA II HONORS 1200340 Grade 9-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: B or better in Geometry Honors and teacher recommendation

Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms.

CALCULUS AB 1202300 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Since this is text-dependent class, cadets must have earned a minimum score of 3 on the FSA/ELA Test. It is recommended that cadets have completed precalculus and is recommended by their teacher.

The purpose of this course is for students to develop knowledge and skills in functions, limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, anti-derivatives, and definite integrals and their applications. These topics are explored graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally, emphasizing connections and applications to the real world. The use of a graphing calculator (TI-83/84)+ is integrated throughout this course.

AP CALCULUS AB 1202310 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Since this Advanced Placement course is a college-level and textdependent class, cadets must have earned a minimum score of 3 on the FSA/ELA Test. It is recommended that cadets have completed Calculus and is recommended by their teacher.

This course is designed to offer students college-level mathematics under the Guidelines of the Advanced Placement Program. Major topics of study include the use of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and mathematical modeling of differential equations; and the applications of these concepts. It will follow the outline set forth by the College Board for Advanced Placement Calculus AB, and is modeled upon and includes the content of a comparable college program, with the primary intent the successful completion of the AP Calculus exam, for college credit.

FINANCIAL ALGEBRA Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra II, OR B or better in Geometry, a 3 or higher on FSA-ELA exam, also with a teacher recommendation.

The financial literacy focus of this course provides a real-life framework to apply upperlevel mathematics standards. In our consumer-based society, a mathematics course that addresses the results of financial decisions will result in more fiscally responsible citizens. This course will give students the opportunity to apply mathematics found in financial topics such as personal investments, retirement planning, credit card interest, taxes, and savings. Please note that the financial literacy standards in this course are repeated in the required Economics course for graduation with a standard high school diploma. *The NCAA does not recognize this course as a math credit. The use of a graphing calculator (TI-83/84)+ is integrated throughout this course.

GEOMETRY 1206310 Grade 9-11, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: C or higher in Algebra I. The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students' geometric experiences from the middle grades.

Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Important differences exist between this Geometry course and the historical approach taken in Geometry classes. For example, transformations are emphasized early in this course. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school standards. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

GEOMETRY HONORS 1206320 Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 1 Honors, Level 4-5 on Algebra EOC, Level 4-5 on FSA-ELA, and teacher recommendation.

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Critical areas include Congruence, Proof, and Constructions; Similarity, Proof, and Trigonometry; Extending to Three Dimensions; Connecting Algebra and Geometry through Coordinates; and Circles With and Without Coordinates:

LIBERAL ARTS MATHEMATICS 1208300 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra 1/Geometry and teacher recommendation Intended for students needing to build confidence, students strengthen their algebra and geometry skills for further study of mathematics.

Topics include Real and Complex Number Systems; Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic Equations; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Polygons; Quadrilaterals; Triangles; Mathematical Reasoning & Problem Solving; and Descriptive Statistics. Important: This course earns elective credit only.

MATH FOR COLLEGE READINESS 1200700 Grade 12 ONLY, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: PERT score only This course is targeted for grade 12 students, whose test scores on the Postsecondary Educational Readiness Test (P.E.R.T.) are at or below the established cut scores for mathematics, indicating that they are not yet “college ready” in mathematics or simply need some additional instruction in content to prepare them for success in college-level mathematics.

This course incorporates the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practices as well as the following Common Core Standards for Mathematical Content: Expressions and Equations, The Number System, Functions, Algebra, Geometry, Number and Quantity, Statistics and Probability, and the Common Core Standards for High School Modeling. The standards align with the Mathematics Postsecondary Readiness Competencies deemed necessary for entry-level college courses.

PRE-CALCULUS 1202340 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra II and teacher recommendation.

Pre-calculus is an excellent final course for students with strong math skills; those students looking to study the sciences, engineering or business in college; or as a stepping stone to calculus. This course includes topics in Polynomial and Rational functions; Trigonometric functions and identities (including polar equations and vectors); Analytical Geometry; and limits and continuity.

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS WITH APPLICATIONS HONORS 1210300 Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra II Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0

Probability and statistics with applications is an excellent final course for students; those students looking to study in the medical field, politics, communications or business in college. This course includes topics in data classification and collection, descriptive statistics (graphs), normal distributions. probability and their distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing (one and two samples), correlation and regression. There is also an emphasis on connections and applications to the real world. The use of a graphing calculator (TI-83/84)+ is integrated throughout this course

Physical Education

AEROBICS I (Functional Fitness) 1503400 Grade 9-12, Credit .50

Aerobics (Functional Fitness) is a high school P.E. elective course that is designed to teach the students lifelong activities that will help them lead a healthy lifestyle. Some of the activities will include; Station workouts (Jump rope, calisthenics, muscular strengthening exercises, cardiovascular strengthening exercises and many more.) The students will also participate in game-like activities such as; Kick Ball, Team Handball, Volleyball, Basketball, and Bound ball.) By the end of the semester, the students should have a healthy relationship with fitness and physical activities.

AEROBICS II (Functional Fitness) 1503410 Grade 9-12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Aerobics 1

Aerobics (Functional Fitness) is a high school P.E. elective course that is designed to teach the students lifelong activities that will help them lead a healthy lifestyle. Some of the activities will include; Station workouts (Jump rope, calisthenics, muscular strengthening exercises, cardiovascular strengthening exercises and many more.) The students will also participate in game-like activities such as; Kick Ball, Team Handball, Volleyball, Basketball, and Bound ball.) By the end of the semester, the students should have a healthy relationship with fitness and physical activities.

BASKETBALL 1 -1503310 Grade 9-12, Credit .50

Basketball 1 is a high school PE elective. Students will learn the fundamentals of the game to include; shooting, passing and dribbling. They will learn the history of the game and be introduced to the rules and regulations needed to play. We will touch upon defensive strategies that include man to man as well as various zone defenses. By the end of the semester, students will be playing 5 on 5 full court games.

BASKETBALL 2 -1503315 Grade 9-12, Credit.50 Prerequisite: Basketball 1

Basketball 2 is a high school PE elective. Students must have had Basketball 1 prior to taking Basketball 2. In Basketball 2 fundamentals will be reviewed while more advanced drills will be introduced. Students will learn how to create an inbound play. They will have more time to spend playing games where they can put into effect the defensive strategies learned in Basketball 1.

FENCING: Individual/Dual Sports 1 – 1502410 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50

Often thought of as an activity just for actors or an elite few, fencing is actually an ideal sport for people of all ages. Fencing develops dexterity, endurance, flexibility, grace, and overall fitness, while also allowing participants the opportunity to hone the mind's problem-solving abilities. It is easily learned and practiced by both young and old, men and women, boys and girls. It has even been molded to fit the needs of the blind and individuals using wheelchairs. The Fencing class is designed to provide each student with the knowledge needed to understand the traditions, techniques, rules, and honor behind one of the oldest sports on earth.

FENCING: Individual/Dual Sports 2 – 1502420 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Individual/Dual Sports 1

Students will build upon the fundamental skills learned in Fencing 1 and learn advanced skills in the Olympic Sport of Fencing. Fencing 2 will engage students in an Olympic style fencing competition with their classmates using electronic fencing gear and scoring equipment. The competition will help build confidence and enhance skills in both fencing, and officiating the sport. The goal of this course is to allow students to grow as individuals and proficient fencers by enhancing their ability to problem solve under the pressure through the use of simulated combat in a safe environment.

OUTDOOR ED (Firearm Safety) 1502480 Grades 11-12 Credit .50

The Outdoor Ed class is designed to teach the student firearm safety by using the National Rifle Association’s method. The class uses the NRA’s Basic Pistol Course with class projects and hands-on exposure to firearms to give the student a well-rounded experience. The students will take field trips to the gun range for live fire exercises and training. The student will also complete the NRS’s online portion of the hunter safety course. This course is necessary if the student desires to obtain a hunting license.

OUTDOOR ED (Archery) 1502470 Grades 11-12 Credit .50

This class is the second half of the semester following Firearm Safety. The student will learn archery through the NASP (National Archery in the Schools) program. Archery helps improve the student’s educational performance and participation in the shooting sports. The students will also learn basic defensive tactics in a safe, controlled environment.

SELF DEFENSE I -1502460 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50

Each cadet will be educated on real-life dangers and how to protect themselves with skills that work effectively for them. This course will cover cognitive, procedural memory, human anatomy, mental preparation, Situational Response Training, strikes, blocks, kicks, escape techniques, pressure points, fitness, and ground defense. SAFETY IS OUR #1 GOAL EVERY DAY ALL DAY! PHYSICAL CONTACT IS A MAJOR PART OF THIS CLASS SELF

DEFENSE II (Comp. Fitness) 1501390 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50

Prerequisite: Self-defense 1 Each cadet will be educated on real-life dangers and how to protect themselves with skills that work effectively for them. This course will cover cognitive, procedural memory, human anatomy, mental preparation, Situational Response Training, strikes, blocks, kicks, escape techniques, pressure points, fitness, and ground defense. SAFETY IS OUR #1 GOAL EVERY DAY ALL DAY! PHYSICAL CONTACT IS A MAJOR PART OF THIS CLASS.

SPORTS OFFICIATING Grades 9-12, Credit .50

To provide students with introductory knowledge, interpretations, skills and mechanical techniques of officiating. Sports officials must be able to bring control to chaos; understand fairness; promote safety and encourage good sportsmanship. A sports official must have the positive characteristics of a police officer, lawyer, judge, accountant, reporter, athlete, and diplomat.

TEAM SPORTS 1 -1503350 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50

This course will provide students with opportunities to acquire knowledge of strategies of team sports and how to play and develop skills in selected team sports while maintaining or improving their personal fitness.

TEAM SPORTS 2 -1503360 Grade 9 – 12, Credit .50

Prerequisite: Team Sports 1 This course will provide students with opportunities to acquire knowledge of strategies of team sports; and how to play and develop skills in selected team sports while maintaining or improving their personal fitness.

VOLLEYBALL 1 -1505500 Grade 9-12, Credit .50

Volleyball class is designed to learn the history, rules of volleyball, score keeping and line judging. Students will learn and demonstrate the skills needed to successfully play a regulation game. The practice of skills will be done through a magnitude of drills. Lead up volleyball games will be played.

VOLLEYBALL 2 -1505510 Grade 9-12, Credit .50

Prerequisite: Volleyball 1 This course will be the beginning of regulation volleyball games. Volleyball 1 must be taken first so that the skills have all been taught and practiced. There will be a tournament at the end of the semester which will be organized and run by the students.

VOLLEYBALL 3 Grade 10-12, Credit .50

Prerequisite: Volleyball 1 & 2 Volleyball 3 class is designed for students who took Volleyball 1 & 2 and want to further their ability in the game. This class will be composed of very competitive gameplay. Students will learn more in-depth rules and “plays” of the sport. Volleyball will be taken to a higher level of play. Volleyball 4 Grade 10-12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Volleyball 1, 2 & 3 This class is designed for multiple tournaments of Volleyball. Students will be in charge of putting together the tournaments, officiating them and running them smoothly. Lots of volleyball games will be played!

WEIGHT TRAINING I -1501340 Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50

The weightlifting class was designed to provide each student with the knowledge needed to understand the importance of strength and fitness training. Students will understand the importance of setting goals for personal improvement and achievement and will leave the class with a lifelong understanding of how to maintain adequate physical fitness for a healthy lifestyle.

WEIGHT TRAINING II -1501350 Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Weight Training 1

Students will build upon the fundamental skills learned in Weight Training 1 and learn advanced skills in the weight room. Students will also feel comfortable writing their own workout program. The goal of this course is to allow the student to leave the class feeling comfortable working out outside of the class.

WEIGHT TRAINING III (Power Lifting) Grade 10-12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Weight Training 1 & 2

The weightlifting class was designed to provide each student with the knowledge needed to understand the importance of strength and fitness training. Students will understand the importance of the benefits of weight lifting on the body. The muscles and nutrition will be discussed in depth. Students will be able to demonstrate multiple exercises that work many of the different muscle groups. This will lead to writing workout plans for other students and being able to lead a workout. Power lift movements will be taught and mastered during this course.

WEIGHT TRAINING IV (Power Lifting) Grade 10-12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: Weight Training 1, 2 & 3

The second part of this class will allow the students to become more confident with writing detailed workouts for themselves and others. New lifts and techniques will be introduced.

Science

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY HONORS 2000360 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Biology Honors with B or better

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth study of the human body. Attention will be paid to anatomical terminology, cells and tissues, energy cycles, inheritance, and the medical profession of disease. The class is designed to meet the needs of students into any branch of the medical profession. Laboratory experiences are included.

BIOLOGY 2000130 Grade 10, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: C or better on Environmental Science.

Biology is the study of life. This course is designed to stimulate reasoning and a better understanding of major biological topics and concepts. Topics studied include cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, taxonomy, classification, human anatomy, and ecology. Throughout the course, Instructional strategies will emphasize in inquiry-based experiments, techniques as well as modeling exercises, projects and problem-solving exercises. An EOC will be taken at the end of the course and will count as 30% of their final grade. Biology is a required course for graduation.

BIOLOGY HONORS 2000320 Grade 9-10, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the acting Department Chair Biology is the study of life.

This course is designed to stimulate reasoning and a better understanding of major biological topics and concepts. Students are expected to be selfmotivated and be able to work independently. Students wills will conduct an in-depth examination of the biological concepts of cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, taxonomy, classification, human anatomy, and ecology. Throughout the course, Instructional strategies will emphasize inquiry-based experiments techniques as well as modeling exercises, projects, and problem-solving exercises. An EOC will be taken at the end of the course and will count as 30% of their final grade. Biology is a required course for graduation.

CHEMISTRY 2003340 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Biology

This course is a general introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic structure, chemical formulas, molecules, and reactions. The course is taught through lecture/discussion, classroom activities, and projects, as well as laboratory experiences. Students enrolled in this course should have good math skills.

CHEMISTRY I HONORS 2003350 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Biology honors or prior approval by the acting Department Chair

This course is an in-depth study of the fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic structure, chemical formulas, molecules, and reactions. Stoichiometry, acids and bases, and colligative properties will also be covered in this honors course. The course is taught through lecture/discussion, classroom activities, and projects, as well as laboratory experiences.

CHEMISTRY II HONORS 2003805 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Chemistry honors or prior approval by the acting Department Chair

This course explores topics from chemistry honors more in-depth. Additional topics like oxidation-reduction, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry are also covered. An additional chemistry focus area topic will be taught in this course. The course is taught through lecture/discussion, classroom activities, and projects, as well as laboratory and research experiences.

CAREERS IN MEDICINE 0800360 Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: B or higher in Biology

This course is required for students wanting to apply for the Sarasota Memorial Hospital Oncology Internship. Careers in Medicine is designed for students who wish to explore the medical and health sciences. The goal of this course is to present major health conditions and pathologies to students, as wells as, various different career opportunities in the health field. Each class varies with guest speakers from medical professions depending on the interests of the students currently enrolled in the course.

DIGITAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 8207310 Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50

This course is designed to provide an overview of current and future business and information systems and trends and to introduce students to the fundamental skills required in today's business and academic environments. Emphasis is placed on developing fundamental computer skills while growing a knowledge of cybersecurity and future technologies. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Digital Info Tech includes the exploration and use of the following technologies: Virtual Reality(VR), Augmented Reality(AR), Artificial Intelligence(AI), Machine Learning(ML), 3D Printing, App Development, Networking, The Internet, Cyber Security/Hacking, Blockchain/Cryptocurrency, Graphic Design, Animation, Web Page Design, Robotics, Micro Electronic, Product Design, Databases, Personal Information Management, Email, Word Processing, Document Manipulation, and the integration of these programs using software that meets industry standards.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 2001340 Grade 9, Credit 1.0 

This course provides the student with a comprehensive study of the effect of human actions on the Earth and quality of life. Topics include pollution, population, resource use, and conservation. Coordinated laboratory activities will be part of this course. This class is required prior to taking Biology.

FOUNDATIONS OF PROGRAMMING Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: None Learn the skills required to be competitive in today’s high-tech workforce.

This course covers the fundamentals of programming and the use of various computer programming languages. Students will learn the concepts, techniques, and processes associated with computer programming and software development. Class projects will include web development, application development, machine learning, programming physical devices (micro-electronic) and student-designed independent projects. The exploration of future technologies and the vast programming career opportunities available in this high-demand field will be a recurring theme throughout this course.

JAVA ESSENTIALS 9007240 Grade 9 – 12, Credit 1.0 

This is a hands on Java Programming course providing an introduction to programming using the Java language. Students are introduced to the application development cycle, the structure of programs, and specific language syntax. The course introduces important algorithmic structures, data structures, string, and character manipulation, dynamic memory allocation, standard I/O, graphical manipulations and fundamental objectoriented programming concepts. The course explains the use of inheritance and polymorphism early on so the students can practice extensively in the hands on labs. Structured programming techniques are emphasized. The course includes the processing of command line arguments and environment variables so students will be able to write flexible, user-friendly programs. Comprehensive hands-on exercises are integrated throughout to reinforce learning and develop real competency.

MARINE SCIENCE 200250 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Biology

This course provides a student with a survey of marine ecosystems. Major topics will include, but will not be limited to physical and chemical oceanography, marine geology, the diversity of the marine organisms, marine plant and animal life, marine ecology, and human interaction with the World's Ocean. Laboratory and fieldwork activities are an integral part of the course, attendance/participation is required for successful completion of this course.

NUTRITION 8500355 Grade 10 – 12, Credit .50 Prerequisite: B or higher in Biology Nutrition is designed for students who are interested in health and nutrition.

The goal of this course is to present the basics of nutrition and explore and discuss multiple types of nutritional diets. An additional focus, new to the course is learning to make basic food items in preparation for college. Some class days will include hands-on cooking of healthy meals.

PHYSICS 2003380 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Student should be concurrently enrolled in or have completed Algebra I

This algebra-based course is designed to provide the students with a strong background in physics by stressing a solid foundation in mechanics and its application to each of the principal areas of physics. The course of study consists of measurement, motion, light theory, electricity, magnetism, and quantum theory. College-bound students are encouraged to take Physics.

PHYSICS HONORS 2003390 Grade 10-12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Student should be concurrently enrolled in or have completed Algebra II

Physics Honors is an Algebra-based study of the laws which govern the physical universe, connecting them with observable phenomenon, and covers the general topics of kinematic and dynamic motions, gravity, uniform circular motion, work, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, waves, optics, fluids, gases, heat, electricity, magnetism, nuclear, quantum and relativity. This course includes extensive use of hands-on labs to demonstrate physics concepts. Students will be challenged to master physics concepts by expressing situations with equations that enable them to solve problems using a basic knowledge of algebra and right angle trigonometry. Students will apply physics principles to real-life situations. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to practice the scientific method as applied to physics while they design and perform independent experiments.

AP PSYCHOLOGY 2107350 Grade 10 – 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the acting Department Chair

AP Psychology is designed for students who wish to experience a college-level introductory course in psychology, and prepare for the rigorous AP Psychology exam. It is designed to replace Introduction to Psychology in a student’s freshmen year in college, and student’s study habits should reflect this fact. Students who chose this course should do so with the understanding that only self-motivated, dedicated, serious students will be successful. The main objective in teaching this course is to prepare students to score at least a 3 on the AP Exam offered by the College Board in May. Students will be exposed to many fields of interest in psychology. Topics covered will be the History of Psychology, Personality Development, Altered States of Consciousness (sleep, dreams, and hypnosis), Learning, Memory, Abnormal Behavior, Biological Basis of Behavior, Motivation, Sensation, Perception, Health Psychology and Social Psychology. Students are expected to develop their critical thinking while building their reading, writing and discussion skills.

Social Studies

Expectations for students choosing honors or Advanced Placement courses will be more demanding and rigorous than those for the regular social studies courses, including a higher level reading materials and texts. Only students who wish to have the rigor of college preparatory social studies courses should choose these honors or Advanced Placement classes.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT - 2106310 Grade 12, credit .50

In American Government, students will dissect the United States Constitution and develop an understanding of the framing of the document; the powers and limitations of the three branches of government; and the extent to which the scope of the American government has changed over the years since our nation’s birth. Students will develop a general understanding of the complexity of the executive offices and the court systems, and will study specific legislation in order to demonstrate the nature to which the federal and state governments attempt to meet the needs and desires of a diverse population of citizens. Finally, students will be given a general overview of their rights and protections as they exist today, and attempts will be made to dispel the kinds of dangerous misunderstandings of law that social media platforms have allowed to flourish.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE I - 8918010 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the criminal justice system and understand the foundation of our laws. Students will study the agencies and processes involved in the criminal justice system, including criminal law, legislature, the courts, and corrections. Students will look at actual cases regarding investigations, arrests and, trial procedures. While the textbook is the main resource used in this course, in order to meet the intent of the standards as well as the rigor expected by the State of Florida and SMA, other materials, including videos, from external repositories will be used.

HONORS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT - 2106320 Grade 12, credit .50

In addition to the material presented in the standard American Government course, the Honors credit places a greater emphasis on essay writing. For example, Honors American Government students will be required to research and articulate political positions, debate oppositions to those positions, and engage in analysis of political leaders’ behaviors over the course of their careers.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE II - 8918020 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0

Students must have successfully completed Criminal Justice I in order to take this class. Criminal Justice II focuses on the forensic aspects of criminal justice. In this course, students will learn about real-world crime scene investigation, from start to finish. A sampling of topics include fingerprinting, blood spatter, and forensic entomology. For this course, two textbooks will be used as well as external readings and videos.

ECONOMICS - 2102335 Grade 12, credit .50

In Economics, students will receive a survey of both micro- and macro- level economic theory. Concepts such as supply and demand, scarcity, and incentives analysis will build to a general understanding of the complexity of specific economic markets and broader economic systems. Students will learn the basics of economic cycles, possible impacts of small-scale and large-scale economic actions, and will learn how economics as a social science can be used to analyze and explain human interactions and decisionmaking. Additionally, students will explore the basics of the modern financial system by examining interest rates, credit ratings, and typical market transactions such as home loans and insurance plans. Finally, students will be encouraged to use these foundations to examine their own economic circumstances and will be encouraged to approach real-world scenarios through the lens of entrepreneurial problem-solving.

HONORS ECONOMICS - 2102345 Grade 12, credit .50

In addition to the material presented in the standard Economics course, the Honors credit places a greater emphasis on essay writing and entrepreneurial problem-solving. For example, Honors students will be required to evaluate international trade policies, identify the difference between short-term and long-term economic consequences, and pitch a business plan.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY - 2103400 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the most recent ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair or IB Coordinator for Pre-IB.

The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.

JOURNALISM I - 1006300 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop fundamental skills in the production of journalism across print platforms and to develop knowledge of journalism history, ethics use, and management techniques related to the production of journalistic media, specifically the yearbook. This course provide cadets the opportunity to be an important part of a digital media and graphic design production class that will publish a 184+ page yearbook which may be purchased and/or critiqued by hundreds of people and read for generations. This is no easy task and requires hard work, dedication, responsibility, accountability, and commitment to go above the minimum requirements of the class. You will gain invaluable real-life working skills that include business management, graphic design, photography, writing and reporting, leadership, and all the while documenting and capturing memories that will last a lifetime. .

JOURNALISM II - 1006310 Grade 9-12, credit 1.0

The purpose of this course is to enable students to extend fundamental skills in the production of journalism across print platforms and to develop knowledge of journalism history, ethics use, and management techniques related to the production of journalistic media, specifically the yearbook. This course provide cadets the opportunity to be an important part of a digital media and graphic design production class that will publish a 184+ page yearbook which may be purchased and/or critiqued by hundreds of people and read for generations. This is no easy task and requires hard work, dedication, responsibility, accountability, and commitment to go above the minimum requirements of the class. You will gain invaluable real-life working skills that include business management, graphic design, photography, writing and reporting, leadership, and all the while documenting and capturing memories that will last a lifetime.

PSYCHOLOGY - 2107300 Grade 10-12, credit .50 

Through the study of psychology, students will acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. The content examined in this first introductory course includes major theories and orientations of psychology, psychological methodology, memory and cognition, human growth and development, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological therapies, stress/coping strategies, and mental health. Students will learn about human behavior, behavior interaction and the progressive development of individuals. While the textbook is the main resource used in this course, in order to meet the intent of the standards as well as the rigor expected by the State of Florida and SMA, other materials, including videos, from external repositories will be used. This Psychology course must be taken with Sociology.

SOCIOLOGY - 2108300 Grades 10-12, credit .50 T

hrough the study of sociology, students acquire an understanding of group interaction and its impact on individuals in order that they may have a greater awareness of the beliefs, values and behavior patterns of others. In an increasingly interdependent world, students need to recognize how group behavior affects both the individual and society.

THE HOLOCAUST - 2109430 Grades 9 – 12, credit .50

This nine-week class examines the events of the Holocaust (1933 to 1945), which was the systematic, planned annihilation of Europe’s Jews and other victims by Nazi Germany. The class will investigate the historical roots of anti-Semitism, and will explore the concepts of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, and upstanders. The goal of this class is to help students understand the ramifications of racism, prejudice, stereotyping, and extreme nationalism, in an effort to help cadets understand how to prevent these genocides from happening again. Parents and guardians need to understand that this class necessarily deals with sensitive material and includes very graphic images. The following films will be shown in their entirety as part of the course curriculum: Schindler’s List, Night and Fog, and Hotel Rwanda. Parents/guardians who do not want their cadets to view these images and films should let the Counseling Office know that their child is not permitted to take this class. This course consists of the following content area strands: World History, Geography and Humanities. This course is a continued in-depth study of the history of civilizations and societies from the middle school course, and includes the history of civilizations and societies of North and South America. Students will be exposed to historical periods leading to the beginning of the 21st Century. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events from ancient and classical civilizations

AP U.S. HISTORY - 2100330 Grade 11 – 12, credit 1.0 Prerequisite: Placement in this course requires a 3 or above on the FSA ELA. Advanced Placement (AP) World History is a college-level course offered as a substitute to general World History, and is typically taken in the sophomore year by those students seeking to earn college credit by taking the APWH examination. This exam is offered nationally by the College Board in the spring semester.

AP World at Sarasota Military Academy is intended to be the second of three AP courses offered in the social studies, between AP Human Geography and AP United States History. Students will be assessed at the anticipated difficulty level of the College Board examination, and as such should expect this course to be a high-difficulty course with a mandatory time commitment outside of the classroom. Despite its difficulty, however, AP World is intended to be the most comprehensive study of the human story that is possible, given the time constraints of a semester class.

U.S. HISTORY – 2100310 Grade 11 - 12, credit 1.0

The United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from Reconstruction to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.

U.S. HISTORY HONORS – 2100320 Grade 11 - 12, credit 1.0

In addition to the U.S. History description, honors U. S. History scaffolds learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended researchbased paper/project (e.g., history fair, participatory citizenship project, mock congressional hearing, projects for competitive evaluation, investment portfolio contests, or other teacher-directed projects).

WORLD HISTORY HONORS - 2109320 Grade 10, credit 1.0 

In addition to the World History description, honors U. S. History scaffolds learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended researchbased paper/project (e.g., history fair, participatory citizenship project, mock congressional hearing, projects for competitive evaluation, investment portfolio contests, or other teacher-directed projects).

WORLD RELIGIONS - 2105310 Grades 9- 12, credit .50

This nine week elective class will examine the core beliefs and history of the following religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Confucianism. Other faith systems will be examined as time permits. Students will be able to identify the similarities and differences among the world’s major religious traditions, and will understand how these religious systems influenced the history and development of the world. The Holocaust is the second part of this course. They must both be taken together.

Speech

SPEECH I - 1007300 Grade 9- 12, Credit 1.0

Note: This course can be applied toward the 1.0 fine arts graduation requirement.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop fundamental skills in formal and informal oral communication. Students will be given numerous opportunities in class to apply these skills through formal and informal listening, viewing, and speaking assignments. These assignments will be varied and cover informative, demonstrative, persuasive and entertaining speech construction and presentation. Students will also have an opportunity to view a variety of speeches in each of these genres and critically analyze their content and delivery. Preparation of speeches will necessarily include coverage of literary techniques and language, organization, and methods of appeal.

SPEECH II - 1007310 Grade 9- 12, Credit 1.0 Prerequisite: a passing grade of 70 or above in Speech I

This course will assist students in expounding upon the basic oratory and presentation Note: This course can be applied toward the 1.0 fine arts graduation requirement. skills acquired in Speech I (1007300) and will provide additional speech writing opportunities and oratory practice. Students will learn how to incorporate various presentation media into their presentations and engage in a more comprehensive critique of self and others.

World Languages

All text dependent world language courses are required for college-bound cadets. Prerequisite: Score of 3 or higher on the ELA/FSA, and/or prior approval by the Department Chair

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 - 0717300

American Sign Language 1 introduces students to the target language and its culture. The student will develop communicative skills in all 3 modes of communication and crosscultural understanding. Emphasis is placed on proficient communication in the language with introductions to culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2 - 0717310 Prerequisite: 75% or better in ASL 1 American Sign Language 2 reinforces the fundamental skills acquired by the students in American Sign Language 1.

The course develops increased receptive and expressive, skills as well as cultural awareness. Specific content to be covered is a continuation of skills acquired in American Sign Language 1 while communication remains the primary objective. The cultural survey of the target language is continued.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3 Honors - 0717312 Prerequisite: 75% or better in ASL 2 American Sign Language 3 provides mastery and expansion of skills acquired by the students in American Sign Language 2.

Specific content includes, but is not limited to, expansions of vocabulary and conversational skills through discussions of selected media. Contemporary vocabulary stresses activities which are important to the everyday life of people using the target language.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 4 Honors - 0717314 Prerequisite: 75% or better in ASL 3 American Sign Language 4 expands the skills acquired by the students in American Sign Language 3.

Specific content includes, but is not limited to, more advanced language structures and idiomatic expressions, with emphasis on conversational skills. There is additional growth in vocabulary for practical purposes. Media selections are varied and taken from authentic target language literary works.

MANDARIN CHINESE I - 0711300

Chinese 1 introduces students to the target language and its culture. The student will develop communicative skills in all 3 modes of communication and cross-cultural understanding. Emphasis is placed on proficient communication in the language. An introduction to reading and writing is also included as well as culture, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students will be taught the basics in order to speak, read and write in the target language. Emphasis is placed upon vocabulary expansion by means of written and oral practice. Cultural aspects of the Chinese Speaking world are also introduced. Students will begin to acquire proficiency in Mandarin Chinese through a linguistic communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of the applied grammar. Cross-cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course.

MANDARIN CHINESE II - 0711310 Prerequisite: 75% or better in Chinese I.

This is a continuation of level one with additional practice in speaking, reading and writing. Extensive grammatical concepts are addressed, in addition to vocabulary that is more sophisticated and advanced verb tenses. The content includes, but is not limited to:  Conversational expression of feelings, ideas, and opinions  Comprehension of spoken and written language  Oral and written presentation of information and ideas, in the target language, to an audience  Social interaction patterns within the Chinese culture  Communication patterns of languages  Chinese language usage within and beyond the school setting

MANDARIN CHINESE III Honors - 0711320 Prerequisite: 75% or better in Chinese II. Chinese 3 provides mastery and expansion of skills acquired by the students in Chinese 2.

Specific content includes, but is not limited to, expansions of vocabulary and conversational skills through discussions of selected readings. Contemporary vocabulary stresses activities which are important to the everyday life of the target language-speaking people.

MANDARIN CHINESE IV Honors - 0711340 Prerequisite: 75% or better in Chinese III. Chinese 4 expands the skills acquired by the students in Chinese 3.

Specific content includes, but is not limited to, more advanced language structures and idiomatic expressions, with emphasis on conversational skills. There is additional growth in vocabulary for practical purposes, including writing. Reading selections are varied and taken from the target language newspapers, magazines, and literary works.

SPANISH 1 - 0708340

Spanish 1 introduces students to the target language and its culture. The student will develop communicative skills in all 3 modes of communication and cross-cultural understanding. Emphasis is placed on proficient communication in the language. An introduction to reading and writing is also included as well as culture, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students will be taught the basics in order to speak, read and write in the target language. Emphasis is placed upon vocabulary expansion by means of written and oral practice. Cultural aspects of the Spanish Speaking world are also introduced. Students will begin to acquire proficiency in Spanish through a linguistic communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on acquisition of the fundamentals of the applied grammar. Cross-cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course.

SPANISH 2 - 0708350 Prerequisite: 75% or higher on preceding levels of Spanish

Spanish 2 reinforces the fundamental skills acquired by the students in Spanish 1. The course develops increased listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as cultural awareness. Specific content to be covered is a continuation of listening and oral skills acquired in Spanish 1. Reading and writing receive more emphasis, while oral communication remains the primary objective. The cultural survey of the target languagespeaking people is continued. This is a continuation of level one with additional practice in speaking, reading and writing. Extensive grammatical concepts are addressed, in addition to vocabulary that is more sophisticated and advanced verb tenses. The content includes, but is not limited to:  Conversational expression of feelings, ideas, and opinions  Comprehension of spoken and written language  Oral and written presentation of information and ideas, in the target language, to an audience  Social interaction patterns within the Spanish Speaking culture  Communication patterns of languages  Spanish language usage within and beyond the school setting

SPANISH 3 Honors - 0708360 Prerequisite: 75% or higher on preceding levels of Spanish Spanish 3 provides mastery and expansion of skills acquired by the students in Spanish 2.

Specific content includes, but is not limited to, expansions of vocabulary and conversational skills through discussions of selected readings. Contemporary vocabulary stresses activities which are important to the everyday life of the target language-speaking people. SPANISH 4 Honors - 0708370 Prerequisite: 75% or higher on preceding levels of Spanish Spanish 4 expands the skills acquired by the students in Spanish 3. Specific content includes, but is not limited to, more advanced language structures and idiomatic expressions, with emphasis on conversational skills. There is additional growth in vocabulary for practical purposes, including writing. Reading selections are varied and taken from the target language newspapers, magazines, and literary works.

AP SPANISH (Spanish Language and Culture) - 0708400 Prerequisite: Approval of Spanish Teacher and 85% or higher in preceding levels of Spanish

The AP program offers the Spanish Language Exam. It is intended for qualified students wishing to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, using authentic materials and sources. Students are prepared to demonstrate their level of proficiency across three communicative modes: Interpersonal Interactive communication, Receptive communication and Presentational communication. The course is comparable to third year College courses that focus on speaking and writing at an advanced level.

SPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS 1 - 0709300

The purpose of this course is to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in their heritage language by reinforcing and acquiring skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. Language Arts Standards are also included in this course to enable students to become literate in the Spanish language and gain a better understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. The course content will reflect the cultural values of Spanish language and societies.

SPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS 2 - 0709310

The purpose of this course is to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in their heritage language by reinforcing and expanding skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as Spanish grammar skills acquired in Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1. Students are exposed to a variety of Spanish literary genres and authors. Language Arts Standards are also included in this course to enable students to become literate in Spanish and gain a better understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. The course content will continue reflecting the cultural values of Spanish language and societies.